Hybrid Publisher Worldwide

ebook distribution

Blog

The Growing Crisis in Research

From Plagiarism Today: Last week, two of the largest academic publishers filed a lawsuit against the social networking site ResearchGate, saying that the site is not doing enough to discourage the pirating of academic papers that they hold the copyright to. It is their second lawsuit against ResearchGate, the first was filed in Germany last year. That case is ongoing. Meanwhile, China has been working for more than five months on creating a blacklist of “poor quality” journals that their scientists should not submit to. Once the list is complete and implemented, research published in those journals will not count toward a scientist’s promotion prospects or grant funding. While these two stories might seem completely separate, they are actually both symptoms of a growing crisis Read More

But How Much Are You Reading?

Listening Up For me, it’s always a kind of relief to write a piece for Writer Unboxed. That’s because you, Unboxed one, are among the most consistent elements of publishing. Writers tend to work through the upheavals of the industry by focusing ever more intently on writing. This actually is not the pathway taken by many others in the industry. As economic and market forces bash and bang up the business, company people (rightly) believe they have a mandate not only to adapt but to innovate, to look for things that will accommodate and/or ameliorate the changing circumstances of a creative industry in profoundly changing times. The industry! The industry! And so my reporting at Publishing Perspectives and at The Hot Sheet have a lot to do with change: lots of trial and lots more erro Read More

How to Nail the First Three Pages

Let’s face it, talking about writing the first pages of a novel is stressful. It can strike terror into the heart of even the most seasoned writer, because as writers we all know how scarily narrow the window is, and yet we must reach through it, grab the reader, and yank them into the story. The problem is that writers often think that what pulls readers in is that perfectly written first sentence. The one that proves you’re a wordsmith. Because, of course, being a “wordsmith” is what defines you as a writer. No, no, no. What makes you a writer is the focused ability to relentlessly dig deep into your protagonist’s past, unearthing the specific material from which the story springs organically. Because it’s the story itself that makes the words potent. Not the other way aro Read More

The Top 10 Writing Posts From September 2018

These were the new Writers Write posts you enjoyed most in September 2018: 7 Reasons Why Introverts Make Good Writers Banned Books Week – The 10 Most Challenged Titles Of 2017 9 Useful Character Questionnaires For Writers Cheryl Strayed’s Advice For Beginner Writers 7 Things You Can Do Today To Become A Better Blogger Tomorrow The AVBOB Poetry Project Year 2 A Magic Trick For Writing The Top 10 Writing Posts From August 2018 10 Things William Faulkner Had To Say About Writing 5 Storytelling Software Options For Busy Writers   Previous Posts The Top 10 Writing Posts From August 2018 The Top 10 Writing Posts From July 2018 The Top 10 Writing Posts From June 2018 Source: writerswrite.co.za Visit us at First Edition Design Publishing Read More

Mindfulness for writers: A beginners guide

The first time I remember using the art of mindfulness I was in an extremely stressful meeting with a drug addict. At risk of losing her children, the woman’s behaviour had become loud and abusive to everyone, including me. Threats were made and accusations were thrown. After one particularly volatile, screaming outburst aimed at me, I felt an acute sense of fear wash over me and grip my heart like a vice. My breathing became more rapid and my fight or flight response kicked in – the door to the meeting room had never looked so inviting. But I was a professional. Someone who was part of the team supporting the children in our school. We were their voices when they couldn’t be heard. Walking out would let them down. It would let my headteacher down. I clasped my hands tightly unde Read More

How to Get Story Ideas From Unexpected Headlines

No, this is not a how-to for creating fake news. It’s a prompt that opens a never-ending well of ideas for any fiction writer. I’m talking about how to get story ideas from headlines in the news. Try it out today and see what happens! How to Get Story Ideas From Headlines: 4 Steps A few years ago, I read a startling headline in a back section of the Sunday newspaper. It said “Man Likely Padlocked Himself in Bag Found in Bathtub.” I blinked twice, sure I had misread something. Even after I read the article, I still couldn’t believe it. I was grieved for his family and friends, but I couldn’t help but see the possibilities for inspiring fiction. I wondered how it could even be done?  As a claustrophobic, I wondered, why? “ It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fictio Read More

6 Questions to Help Nonfiction Writers Find Their Niche

Today’s guest post is by Erica Meltzer of The Critical Reader. In 2008, I took a trip to the bookstore that altered the course of my career. I was working as a freelance tutor and had recently been hired to help prepare a student for the Writing (grammar) portion of the SAT. In need of practice material, I went down to my local Barnes & Noble and began flipping through the standard prep books. As I read, I grew increasingly frustrated: in some, the questions were too easy, in others too hard. Some of them targeted concepts that were not tested, or omitted concepts that were tested. And overall, the tone and style seemed somehow…off. I’d had a handful of gigs writing practice questions for various test-prep companies, but until that point, it had never occurred to me that I Read More

4 Steps to a Writing Routine You Won’t Want to Break

Guest post by Emmanuel Nataf You’ve wanted to write a novel for ages, but can’t seem to ever find the time to start writing. Or maybe you’ve started and just keep hitting walls. Why? For most of us, the answer is that commitments like family, jobs, and life keep getting in the way. Or, it might be procrastination, and these obstacles are what you tell yourself are the issue. All you are missing is discipline. Every writer has a vision of being able to sit down and write a complete prize-winning chapter in one sitting, but this isn’t realistic. To get a flow going on a regular basis you will need to implement a writing routine. Forming a regular writing habit builds stakes, holds you accountable to your goals, and keeps you on track as a result. The reality is, you’re not goin Read More

Overcoming Creativity Wounds

Today’s guest post is by Grant Faulkner, executive director of Nanowrimo and author of Pep Talks for Writers. For writers unaware, Nanowrimo is National Novel Writing Month, where writers around the world challenge themselves to write 50,000 words in 30 days. It starts November 1. Learn more. Somewhere deep within most of us, there is a wound. For some, it’s vile and festering; for others, it’s scarred over. It’s the type of wound that doesn’t really heal at least not through any kind of stoic disregard or even the balm of time. I’m not talking about a flesh wound, but a psychological wound—the kind that happens when someone told you in an elementary school art class that you didn’t draw well, or when you gave a story to a friend to read in the hopes they would shower Read More

Positive Writer The Contradictory Nature of Writing Advice: What to Do When You Get Conflicting Information

I spent this past weekend at a creative non-fiction writer’s conference with my mom. We had such a great time spending our days attending lectures, panels, readings, and story slams, usually with a cup of tea or coffee in our hands. Creative non-fiction isn’t even my primary genre, but I thought it would be beneficial to branch out a little and explore some new things. This post is by Positive Writer contributor The Magic Violinist. And I was right; I received great advice from various memoirists and freelance writers about craft, the publishing industry, and marketing. But early on something became apparent: the knowledge I gained was contradictory. What to do with conflicting information In one lecture I was told to buy a planner, set strict deadlines for myself, and track my progr Read More

How to end a novel: Writing strong story endings

Knowing how to end a novel is an essential skill for fiction writers. Story endings often stay with us as readers – especially when they’re satisfying, haunting, clever or profound. Here are 7 ways to end a novel. May they inspire you to find the best closing for your story: 1. Leave readers guessing: The open-ended story 2. Bring readers full circle: Ending where you began 3. Pull the rug from beneath their feet: Shocking twist endings 4. Create feel-good lingering: ‘Happily ever after’ endings 5. Build in ‘what next?’ – Cliffhanger endings 6. Create complex resolutions: Combining ending types 7. Avoid cliched and unsatisfying story endings: Ending ‘don’ts’ Let’s explore each of these story ending types in greater detail: 1. Leave readers guessing: The open-ended st Read More

Even if it’s better than creative accountancy, creative writing still needs rules | Creative Writing 101

Subtle but important differences With an extreme simplification, creative writing can be considered any writing in which authors make things up. It’s sort of like creative accountancy, but with three important differences. Firstly, your chances of becoming rich with creative writing are slim at best. Secondly, also your chances of ending up in a jail if you pursue a career in creative writing are pretty slim. Lastly, creative writing is aimed at a public as wide and eager as possible whereas the gurus, so to speak, of creative accountancy aim at being read by as few people as possible. And the more the reading is superficial and inattentive, the better. I know, I know. From this point of view, creative accountancy seems a lot more thrilling than creative writing. I mean, with all t Read More

Should Beginning Writers Imitate the Greats?

Learning often begins with imitation or copying. As babies, we learn facial expressions and gestures by mimicking adults. Children learn to write their letters by copying them from workbooks. And can you imagine a musician learning their craft without first leaning to play other musicians’ songs? But we rarely explore the question of whether writers should copy the work of great authors as a learning exercise. Imitation Learning vs. Derivative Works In the world of fine art and entertainment, imitation is sometimes viewed as flattery, but mostly it’s criticized for its lack of originality. Works that appear to be based in part or in full on other works are called derivative works. Some derivative works are celebrated — for example, writing a variation of an old fairy tale or writing Read More

How to Break Through a Fiction Writing Block

It happens to all writers. You’re cruising through a story, and all of a sudden you hit a wall. Your characters freeze up, your plot stops cold, and you’re stuck with nowhere to go. You’ve hit a fiction writing roadblock. All of your ideas have evaporated and you sit there staring at your screen with a blank look on your face. Where were you going? How did you write yourself into a corner? More importantly, how do you write yourself out? Fortunately, there are techniques you can use to break through the creative blocks that arise in the middle of a storytelling project. Some of these techniques also come in handy when developing ideas for new fiction projects. The main thing you need to remember is that hitting a roadblock does not have to mean the end of your story, your fiction Read More

How to Overcome Perfectionism to Boost Your Writing Productivity

Do you want to boost your writing productivity? Then ask yourself if any of the following apply to you: You’re very hard on yourself, especially when things go wrong. You spend more time than you should on a task because you want it to be done just right. You have extremely high standards, and will sometimes sacrifice your own well-being to complete a project perfectly. You’re the first to find errors and correct them, knowing that finding mistakes in a completed project will drive you nuts. You tend to ruminate over past mistakes and always vow not to repeat them. If you found that two or more of these described you, you tend toward perfectionism. If you related to more than that, you may be a full-blown perfectionist. Now don’t panic. Perfectionists sometimes get a bad rap Read More

4 Easy Edits That Make Your Story Flow Better

As a copy editor, I’ve learned a lot about improving the flow of my own writing as I’ve tweaked the manuscripts of others. Today I want to share five easy edits you can make yourself that invite the reader deeper into the story and provide the impact you want to have. 1. Eliminate crutch words. Crutch words are words we lean on too much in our writing — used when unnecessary, repeated too often, diluting the point. Like many definitions, it’s easier to understand when you see examples. Here are a few: just, so, definitely, really, very, suddenly, and (at the beginning of sentences), smiled, shrugged, knew, saw, heard. Adverbs are most often the culprits, but you might wonder what’s bad about knew, saw, and heard. Nothing is wrong with any of these words used well, but we tend Read More

Small Moments Make Your Story Big

“A big story is about a small moment.” ~Matthew Dicks Think about that for a moment (not a small one). Every book you have ever read is about a small moment—an epiphany when a character realizes an emotional truth with complete clarity. Let me provide examples: THE MONSTORE is not just about a store that sells monsters. It’s about a brother and sister who learn to appreciate one another and cooperate.   7 ATE 9 is about number 9 realizing his worth.   LITTLE RED GLIDING HOOD is about not judging someone before you get to know them.   Before I read Matthew Dicks’ STORYWORTHY, I used to phrase this “small moment” concept differently. I would explain that a story, especially a picture book, required an emotional core. Now I realize that is an amorphous blob of Read More

Deconstructing Best Sellers in Your Niche Genre

I’ve been studying thrillers because I’m about to write a thriller series. Even though I’ve written a couple of novels with thriller elements, I want to nail this genre. I want my novels in this series to fit right up there with best-selling authors. And that has involved a lot of work. I spent a bunch of money flying to NY to attend Thrillerfest (and I’m so glad I did!). I took a masters class, and all-day ATF workshop (the highlight of the week!), I met with and shmoozed with best-selling authors. I listened to panel discussions. And so much more. In addition, I’ve been doing hours of research online. I’ve made phone appointments to talk with experts (FBI, ATF, park rangers, lightning experts, etc.). I am heading up to Seattle to scout locations and meet with local ATF spec Read More

Nonfiction Writers: Beware the Curse of Knowledge

Today’s guest post is excerpted from Writing to Be Understood by Anne Janzer (@AnneJanzer) a professional writer who has worked with more than one hundred technology companies, writing in the voice of countless brands and corporate executives. Few of your readers care about what you know, no matter how many years you have spent accumulating that wisdom. They care about what they need or want to understand. You share much in common with your readers: you both live a world with numerous, competing demands on your attention, limited time for “deep reading,” and perhaps a longing for simplicity and clarity. How do you provide the right amount of information without either oversimplifying the subject or overloading the reader? You’ll have to decide what to include and what to leave Read More

Book Promotion: What’s Hot, What’s Not

These days there are so many ways of promoting a book—yet also so many chances of that book not being noticed at all in the flood of promotion that washes over people daily. So as an author, what do you do? In this post I’m listing a few things that have worked—and not worked—for me. These are very personal observations of course; you may have had a totally different experience. What’s hot: Cover reveals on social media—accompanied by an intriguing ‘tag.’ These can start a buzz well before publication. What’s not: Book trailers on You Tube or similar channels. Heaps of fun to make but in terms of effects on sales, pretty much nil. You don’t get half as many people looking at them, compared to cover reveals. However, as long as they don’t cost you heaps of money an Read More