Things Never to Put In Your Author Bio

Posted: July 9, 2014 in Publishing
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Print On Demand First Edition Design Publishing

Publishers – Aggregators – Master Distributors

 

MONDAY, JULY 7, 2014

 

I interact with a lot of authors, many of whom contact me about getting interviewed for my writing site. I see a lot of author bios, some that wow me and many that make me cringe. I’d even include myself in that mix.


Don’t Throw Words In That Have Nothing to Do With Being a Writer

 

When I published my first poetry book ten years ago, I had just come off a 20-year career in marketing. I felt this was important somehow, mainly because I didn’t have many other writing credentials. I did have several freelance articles published, but didn’t feel that “made me a writer.” (Don’t we love it when we seek permission to define ourselves that way?)

 

So my writer bio went something like this: Cherie Burbach is a poet and marketing professional.

So far so good, right? Not so fast. In reviewing my book, one reader wrote on her blog something like this: “I enjoyed her poems but I don’t see what being a marketing professional has to do with anything.” She then went on to offer up some of the things she liked about the book, but I couldn’t get past her statement. What a great lesson for me. Who cared that I worked in marketing? My readers certainly didn’t.

 

After this I became more aware of my bio. I still tweak it. I try and make it sound pertinent and interesting, but I’m sure I’ll be updating and changing it as long as I’m given the opportunity to write.

 

Problogger

 

Once upon a time, the word “problogger” was really cool. It was arguably started by Darren Rowse who named his site that way and described what he did as professional blogging. At the time, people were experimenting with blogging, just using it as a means of expression (before every writer on the planet realized it was a way to get a platform) and Rowse helped show that you could make a serious living that way.

 

Now, I see this word used all the time by authors who blog here and there (guest posts on their friend’s blogs, promotional posts, blog tour posts) but don’t really do “professional” blogging.

 

Why do I care? Because I am a paid blogger and there’s a big difference. Stating you’re a “problogger” implies that you’re an expert at SEO and the latest Google algorithm. It means companies pay you big bucks to create blog posts for them, and that you’re probably also really good at social networking (which is the other piece of professional blogging.)

 

Fans don’t know or care about this term. If you’ve got a blog or appear on a couple of their favorite sites, that’s what they care about. Mostly, they just care about your books.

 

Active Member

 

Be careful about saying you’re an “active member” of an organization. I see this constantly with one or two organizations in particular, and think it makes you sound like you’re a national chapter leader when maybe you’re just a member… like everyone else.

 

I first saw this listed on a new author’s bio for an organization that I had recently joined. I excitedly asked her how she was involved (hoping to get more involved myself) and she told me she commented on the group’s email loops. That’s being “actively involved”? I don’t think so.

 

The danger in listing this is it makes you sound like you’re trying to sound more important than you are, and readers don’t care about this stuff. Your bio should tell a reader about yourself, not fluff up your credentials.

 

__________________________________________________________

 

Cherie Burbach has written for About.com, NBC/Universal, Match.com, and more. Visit her website, cherieburbach.com.

 

First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts, formats and submits Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and scores of additional on-line retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The company is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with both Apple and Microsoft.

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

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