Archive for June, 2014

FranceOn Wednesday, the French parliament passed a long-debated law that will end Amazon.com’s ability to offer a combined 5% discount and free shipping on books shipped to France, according to Livres Hebdo (as translated on Frenchculture.org).

France’s fixed book price law, dubbed “The Lang Law,” was passed in 1981 and allows for a maximum 5% discount under varied positions.

“The ‘Anti-Amazon Law,’ was created to prevent ecommerce sites like [the American giant] Amazon from stamping out the iconic network of independent French bookshops that currently struggle to compete,” wrote Livres Hebdo.

French Minister of Culture Aurélie Filippetti commented: “As we have just seen again, laws pertaining to the book economy always generate consensus, if not unanimity. This is a sign of our deep attachment to books in this nation, and it demonstrates the belief that France builds itself through its past and its future.”

France has some 3,500 bookshops in France, including 800 independent stores.

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

First Edition Design Publishing

 by:

Categories: Brian Klems’ The Writer’s Dig Tags: Brian Klems.

questions-to-ask-an-agentAn agent has offered me representation, but I don’t know how to tell if she’s right for me. What are the most important questions a writer should ask an agent before signing? —Anonymous

There are hundreds of questions you could ask an agent, from the sensible “What attracted you to my book?” to the slightly less sensible “When will you net me my first million?” The key is to choose the ones that will get you the most important information you need to make an informed decision.

Here’s a list of the five most crucial questions you should ask any agent before agreeing to join her client list.

1. Why do you want to represent me and my work?

The agent should be able to answer this easily. Agents generally take on projects that they not only think will sell well, but that they personally admire. This question gives the agent an opportunity to express her interest to you.

[Want to land an agent? Here are 4 things to consider when researching literary agents.]

2. How did you become an agent/get your start in publishing?

You want an agent who has a history in publishing, whether as a junior associate at a well-known agency or perhaps as an editor with a small imprint. You need to be assured that the agent knows the business and has the contacts necessary to give your book its best shot. You might also want to ask if the agent could refer you to one of her clients in your genre as well; getting the perspective of a writer who is in the role you’re about to step into can be invaluable.

3. What editors do you have in mind for my book? Have you sold to them before? Will you continue to market to other editors if you can’t make a deal with your first choices?

This is more of a three-part question, but it’s the overall answer that you want. By asking these questions, you’re checking to see if this agent has connections, and you’re also clarifying her overall game plan. This is key. You want to make sure your expectations are aligned.

[Understanding Book Contracts: Learn what’s negotiable and what’s not.]

4. What books have you sold recently?

This indicates whether the agent has a track record of selling books in your category or genre.

5. Why should I sign with you?

You’re about to enter into a partnership that neither party should take lightly. This is an opportunity for the agent to pitch you, just as you’ve pitched her, and convince you that she’s the right person to represent your work.

You’ll have additional questions more specific to your work, so don’t hesitate to ask them. They’ll simply show the agent that you’re savvy about your book’s target market. Agents are used to these inquiries, so they are unlikely to be surprised by any questions you may have. And if an agent refuses to answer anything on the list above, that should be a red flag that something is amiss.

2014-guide-to-literary-agentsGet the #1 guide to finding contact information, 
“How to Submit” submission guidelines and more for nearly 
every literary agent there is with the Guide to Literary Agents
Order now from WD and get a steep discount.

Thanks for visiting The Writer’s Dig blog. For more great writing advice, click here.

*********************************************************************************************************************************

brian-klems-2013Brian A. Klems is the online editor of Writer’s Digest and author of the popular gift book Oh Boy, You’re Having a Girl: A Dad’s Survival Guide to Raising Daughters.

Follow Brian on Twitter: @BrianKlems
Sign up for Brian’s free Writer’s Digest eNewsletter: WD Newsletter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

 

First Edition Design eBook Publishers

First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook distributor.

From the good folks at  Beyond Paper Editing

Editors’ tips for writers
by C.K. MacLeod
@CKmacleodwriter

Learning to write well is a process, and there is so much to consider—from story structure to the words you choose.

In self-publishing circles, there is a lot of discussion about perfecting plot, characters, and dialogue—the elements of story—but comparatively little airtime is given to the building blocks of stories: words.

Sometimes, the words we use can clutter our writing and jolt the reader out of the story. Strunk & White calls these words “needless words.” That’s good news. If these words are needless, we don’t need them, and if your writing will be better without them, the solution is simple!

Needless Words

So, what are needless words? In a nutshell, any word that can be deleted without altering the meaning of a sentence or threatening correct grammatical construction is a needless word.
Strunk and White list some examples in the Omit Needless Words section of their famous style guide. Janice Hardy’s Words to Avoid list is another terrific resource for learning which words you can do without.

Hunting down needless words is an easy way to clean up your writing because it often requires nothing more from you than to find the offending words and press the delete button. Excise these words from your writing and you’re well on your way to communicating clearly.

Finding Needless Words

I know what you’re thinking… Do I have to pick through every word in my 300-page book?You can, but I’m not suggesting that you find needless words manually in a word-by-word manner. Oh, no. There are tools for that. Nowadays, simple tech tools can help you root out those words that muddy your writing.

Below, I’ve listed two tools that authors can use to polish their prose: one for Word users and the other for Scrivener users.

Word Tool

In Microsoft Word, you can use a simple highlighting macro that will hunt down and highlight all of the needless words in your book in a matter of minutes. I call it the Needless Words macro, in honour of Strunk & White. You can then decide how to address those highlighted words (delete them!).

NeedlessWords macro in action

You can find the Needless Words macro at Tech Tools for Writers.

Scrivener Tool

Scrivener’s Word Frequency tool is less sophisticated, but still worth a mention. It doesn’t highlight needless words, but it indicates words you may have overused. You can then use Scrivener’s Find and Replace function to find and scrutinize those words you’ve used most. In Scrivener, you can find the Word Frequency tool by going to the Project, Text Statistics, Word Frequency.

Scrivener’s Text Statistics tool

Scrutinizing words is best left for the revision stage of writing, after the the big-picture elements and paragraph-level elements have been addressed. Taking the time to give your writing attention at the word level will ensure a smoother read for your readers.

 

First Edition Design Publishing

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

 

First Edition Design Publishing

Publisher – Aggregator – Master Distributor

From David Gaughran:

I have some huge news: Writer’s Digest has terminated its partnership with Author Solutions.

Abbott Press – the imprint launched by Writer’s Digest, parent company F+W Media, and white-label vanity press provider Author Solutions – is still operational, but all ties to Writer’s Digest have been cut.

It appears that Abbott Press will now be run directly as yet another Author Solutions brand but Writer’s Digest and F+W Media will have no further connection with it.

. . . .

Writer’s Digest and F+W Media refuse to comment, despite being given several opportunities, but I’ve had this news confirmed by multiple sources. As Author Solutions only tends to allow early termination of partnership agreements if the partner signs a series of non-disclosure agreements, a formal announcement or comment is unlikely.

However, it’s clear from the websites of Writer’s Digest and Abbott Press that all links between the companies are in the process of being severed.

. . . .

Author Solutions aggressively pursues strategic partnerships to lend credibility to its scammy practices. More importantly, these partners help keep the pipeline of email addresses and phone numbers flowing. As I detailed two weeks ago, Author Solutions needs huge numbers of leads because it only converts 5% of queries into customers.

Author Solutions first floated a partnership in 2010, but Jane Friedman – then publisher of Writer’s Digest – was unhappy with the idea and the direction the company was taking in general, and resigned.

. . . .

This is a huge partner for Author Solutions to lose – the biggest so far by some stretch.

 

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

 First Edition Design eBook Publishing

 

logo v2 600x124 02
June 17, 2014

The Future of Ink article by  How to Get Book Reviews - The 5 Myths by Shelley HitzGetting reviews for your book is an essential part of the publishing and marketing process. However, there are many misconceptions authors have regarding book reviews.  In this post I address the5 common myths about getting reviewsfor your book.

Myth #1:  Customers Don’t Read Reviews

Reviews are important and research has actually shown they do impact buying decisions.  A research study conducted by Dimensional Research showed that 90% of customers reported reading positive reviews online impacted their buying decisions.In the same way, 86% of customers said reading negative reviews online impacted their buying decisions as well. Tip:  Make sure you don’t ignore this important step of getting honest reviews for your book.  They have more impact than you may realize.

Myth #2:  Anyone Can Post Reviews on Amazon

As an author, it is important understand each retailer’s terms of service regarding reviews.  For example, Amazon prohibits authors from reviewing a competitor’s book that would be seen as a “directly competing product.” Tip:  Even though “directly competing” authors are unable to post reviews for you,you can ask them for endorsementsYou can then put these endorsements in the beginning of your book as well as in the “Editorial Reviews” section on your sales page.

Myth #3:  You’re Going To Spend an Arm and a Leg on Review Copies

You may think that you have to spend a fortune to give out review copies of your book.  First, you have to pay for the print book copies and then you have to pay to have it shipped to your reviewer.  If the reviewer is international, the shipping will be even more expensive. Tip: However, you can significantly cut your costs by sending out eBook copies to reviewers.  You can send out PDF, mobi, and/or epub copies of your books to most reviewers.  You may still want to send print copies to certain high profile book review bloggers and/or potential endorsers for your book, but most reviewers will agree to review a digital copy of your book.

Myth #4:  No Reviews Are Better Than Bad Reviews

When writing, publishing, and marketing your book it is good to know upfront that you will get both positive and negative reviews.After pouring your time and talent into your book (and some of your hard earned money), it is natural to want to see all 4 and 5 star reviews. However, the reality is that you will NOT please every reader who buys your book. Even the very best authors still get 1, 2, and 3 star reviews on their books.

Even the very best authors still get 1, 2, and 3 star reviews on their books.

Sometimes negative reviews can actually be helpful.You may think that no reviews are better than bad reviews.  But if your book has all 5 star reviews, people may think all your reviews are from supporters: your family and friends. Tip:We encourage you to not be afraid of getting negative reviews. Expect that they will come and then move on. If you have written a good book, good reviews will continue to come in faster than the bad reviews and your overall rating will still remain high.

Myth #5:  Everyone Who Agrees to Review Your Book Will Follow Through

Understand that not all readers who agree to review your book will actually follow through. Don’t take it personally as your reviewers are volunteers and have busy lives, but make sure to send at least one follow up e-mail message. Tip:  We have found that sending a follow-up message to reviewers who have not posted a review can double the response rate. Reviewers will sometimes forget, or lose the links, to post the review. They are busy just like us. Sending a simple reminder can make a huge difference.   Read the rest of this article on The Future of Ink:http://thefutureofink.com/how-to-get-book-reviews/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+tfoi+%28The+Future+of+Ink%29 logo v2 600x124 02

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

 

Found at Publisher’s Weekly!

BookReels, a dedicated interactive website that allows publishers and authors to post multimedia visuals ranging from animated book covers to trailers, is now available for readers as a unique way to preview and browse books.

The founder and CEO of BookReels is Dan Rosen, a screenwriter and director who has worked on a number of book trailers. With his friend CV Herst, a writer and tech entrepreneur, the Los Angeles-based duo came up with the idea to create a website where authors and publishers could easily promote themselves, through visual means, and simultaneously sell their work.

Registration on the site is free, and BookReels members have access to 3,000 trailers and author interviews, as well as the option to purchase books through either IndieBound or Amazon.

“What MTV did for music videos and record sales, BookReels wants to do for book trailers and book sales,” Rosen said. The site includes over 20 book categories. The most popular category is young adult fiction, which features hundreds of trailers, author interviews, and live readings. The adult fiction category is the second most popular category.

Book trailers on the site range from classics such as Anna Karenina to Tina Fey’s Bossypants. According to user ratings, some of the current member favorites trailers for Emma Donaghue’s Frog Music, which utilizes a slideshow; Tim Winton’s Eyrie, a creepy live action trailer; and The One & Only by Emily Giffin.

Without any live action filming, Giffin’s trailer represents what can be done with just a simple book cover animation, and blurbs.

Tiffany Hawk’s Love Me Anyway: A Novel was published a year ago, but the book trailer ranks #1 on the site’s top ten list because of its darkly funny execution. “Book trailers vary in style and delivery from homemade to professional productions,” said Rosen. “They help provide an outlet for authors and publishers on a shoestring budget, and a platform for the seasoned bestsellers as well.” Once submissions are approved, they appear on BookReels free of charge.

Members are offered a variety of free options on the site. With access to community pages, they can rate trailers, post comments and reviews, join discussion groups, and share BookReel discoveries through a variety of social media sites. On the Recommend a Reel page, members can also submit their own book-related videos.

Tyson Cornell, founder of Rare Bird Lit book promotions, has embraced BookReels as an effective way to visually market books. “There just hasn’t been a platform beyond YouTube and Author Central that can stimulate book sales until now,” Cornell said. “BookReels has the potential to connect more books with readers. It definitely fills a void.”

 

First Edition Design Publishing

Visit us: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com