12 Classic Books That Got Horrible Reviews When They First Came Out

Posted: March 6, 2015 in Publishing
Tags: , ,
Posted: 01/23/2015 9:22 am EST Updated: 01/23/2015 9:59 am EST
FAIL PAPER

Reviewers are tasked with the daunting challenge of critically assessing a work’s artistic merit, and determining whether a book is worth readers’ valuable time. They are often also expected to predict — or influence — a novel’s future, an assignment that may be impossible to fulfill with complete accuracy. Which is one reason why the art of the negative review has been called into question recently — not only do writers need our support, there’s also often a dissonance between critical reception and, say, Goodreads’ crowd-sourced opinions. The Goldfinch is just one recent example of a title that failed to garner the support of top reviewers, but charmed book lovers (not to mention the 2014 Pulitzer judges) nevertheless.

Donna Tartt was preceded by a slew of talented writers whose works were initially snubbed by critics. Fitzgerald’s Gatsby (y’know — the Great one?) was originally panned as “obviously unimportant,” and Brave New World was once said to be “heavy-handed propaganda.” Yikes! Below are 12 classic books that once received bad reviews:

Read the rest at The Huff

 

 

First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts, formats and submits Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and scores of additional on-line retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The company is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with both Apple and Microsoft.

 

 Visit us at First Edition Design Publishing

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s