Tag Archives: ereader

Kobo Takes On Amazon In Japan #FED_ebooks #ebooks #Kobo #Author #Amazon

 

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In Japan, Kobo E-Reader Takes On Paper Books — And Amazon

The standard gripe among old-media romantics these days is that nobody reads real books anymore, but perhaps those folks just haven’t been to Japan.

Despite the Land of the Rising Sun’s avowed tech-loving ethos, Japanese consumers have been slow to jump on the e-book bandwagon embraced by Europe and the United States, where Amazon’s (Nasdaq: AMZN) Kindle has permeated every bus, train and subway on both continents. Japan, conversely, stands as an oasis of ink and paper — a place where, against all odds, people still overwhelmingly prefer traditional books.

But they may not prefer them for long.   

The Tokyo-based e-commerce giant Rakuten (4755: JASDAQ) introduced its Kobo Touch e-reader on Thursday, and early reports suggest that the device is already a hit. The Kobo jumped almost instantly to the top spot on Rakuten’s website of more than 100,000,000 products since it became available for pre-order on July 2. Kobo CEO Mike Serbinis said in a statement that the company was “thrilled to see this response from the Japanese people.”

Other electronics companies have tried amid little fanfare to ignite an e-book boom in the world’s second-largest publishing market. Sony (NYSE: ADR), whose LIBRIe electronic reading device practically kicked off the e-book industry in 2004, has been unable to create much interest, even on its home turf.

First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts, formats and submits Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and scores of additional on-line retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The company is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.  www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

Datou Amazon?

With the arrival of the Kobo Touch, however, Amazon’s Japanese debut — whenever it happens — may be too little, too late. The Kobo Touch uses the EPUB 3.0 format, the industry standard, which supports Japanese-language layout and vertical text and ruby characters. It also supports Manga titles, which have already proven popular among younger Japanese consumers who read them via cellphones. 

At Tokyo’s E-Book Expo earlier this month, Rakuten CEO Hiroshi Mikitani touted his soon-to-be-released Kobo Touch by passing out T-shirts inscribed with the words, “Datou Amazon” or “Destroy Amazon.” Some publishers at the expo applauded Mikitani’s message. Still reluctant to do business with the notorious American giant, they are hopeful that the inevitable foray into e-publishing doesn’t have to involve selling out.

That may not bode well for the future of paper books in Japan, but at least the book industry there will live to see its next chapter.

 Source: www.ibtimes.com By: Christopher Zara – July 20, 2012

First Edition Design Publishing  is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts, formats and submits Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and scores of additional on-line retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD  division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The company is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with both Apple and Microsoft. First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts, formats and submits Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and scores of additional on-line retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The company is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.

www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

First Edition Design eBook Publisher Aggregator Master Distrbutor

Tablet PC Comparison

A side by side comparison of more than 40 tablet PCs

This survey from www.tabletpccomparison.net shows cost in USD, screen resolution, CPU, Ghz, operating system, storage, battery life in hours, and the tablet weight in lbs and kg.

Tablet PCs from Acer, Samsung, Apple, Asus, Toshiba, Coby, Le Pan, Sony, Vizio, HP, Dell, Blackberry, B&N Nook, Nexus and Motorola are compared. The viewer can sort models by clicking on column headers.

To view click on the graphic >

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

First Edition Design eBook and POD PublishingFirst Edition Design Publishing  is the world’s largest eBook distributor. Ranked first in the industry, they convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network.The Company is a licensed and approved eBook Aggregator, Apple Developer and Microsoft Solution Provider.

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New Statistics for eBooks and Libraries #ebook #FED_ebooks #Library #Author

First Edition Design Publishing
Libraries, patrons, and e-books
Source: PewInternet.org  Released: June 22, 2012

by Kathryn ZickuhrLee RainieKristen PurcellMary Madden and Joanna Brenner

Summary of findings

12% of readers of e-books borrowed an e-book from the library in the past year. But a majority of Americans do not know that this service is provided by their local library.

Some 12% of Americans ages 16 and older who read e-books say they have borrowed an e-book from a library in the past year.

Most e-book borrowers say libraries are very important to them and their families and they are heavy readers in all formats, including books they bought and books lent to them. E-book borrowers say they read an average (the mean number) of 29 books in the past year, compared with 23 books for readers who do not borrow e-books from a library. Perhaps more striking, the median (midpoint) figures for books reportedly read are 20 in the past year by e-book borrowers and 12 by non-borrowers.

But most in the broader public, not just e-book readers, are generally not aware they can borrow e-books from libraries. We asked all those ages 16 and older if they know whether they can borrow e-books from their library and 62% said they did not know if their library offered that service. Some 22% say they know that their library does lend out e-books, and 14% say they know their library does not lend out e-books.

These findings are striking because more than three-quarters of the nation’s public libraries lend e-books.1

In the general public, even many of those who presumably have an interest in knowing about the availability of free library loans of e-books are not sure about the situation at their local library:

  •  58% of all library card holders say they do not know if their library provides e-book lending services.
  • 55% of all those who say the library is “very important” to them say they do not know if their library lends e-books.
  • 53% of all tablet computer owners say they do not know if their library lends e-books.
  • 48% of all owners of e-book reading devices such as original Kindles and NOOKs say they do not know if their library lends e-books.
  • 47% of all those who read an e-book in the past year say they do not know if their library lends e-books.

E-book borrowers appreciate the selection of e-books at their local library, but they often encounter wait lists, unavailable titles, or incompatible file formats.

Focusing on those who do borrow e-books from libraries, two-thirds say the selection is good at their library: 32% of e-book borrowers say the selection at their library is “good,” 18% say it is “very good,” and 16% say it is “excellent.” Some 23% say the selection is only “fair,” 4% say it is “poor,” and 8% say they don’t know.

 We asked those who borrowed e-books whether they had experienced several of the difficulties that could be associated with such borrowing, and found that:

  • 56% of e-book borrowers from libraries say that at one point or another they had tried to borrow a particular book and found that the library did not carry it.
  • 52% of e-book borrowers say that at one point or another they discovered there was a waiting list to borrow the book.
  • 18% of e-book borrowers say that at one point or another they found that an e-book they were interested in was not compatible with the e-reading device they were using.

Many Americans would like to learn more about borrowing e-books.

We also asked all those who do not already borrow e-books at the public library how likely it would be that they might avail themselves of certain resources if their library were to offer them. The results:

  • 46% of those who do not currently borrow e-books from libraries say they would be “very” or “somewhat” likely to borrow an e-reading device that came loaded with a book they wanted to read.
  • 32% of those who do not currently borrow e-books say they would be “very” or “somewhat” likely to take a library class on how to download e-books onto handheld devices.
  • 32% of those who do not currently borrow e-books say they would be “very” or “somewhat” likely to take a course at a library in how to use an e-reader or tablet computer.

Those most interested in these services include some groups that librarians are especially eager to reach. African-Americans, Hispanics, and those who live in lower-income households are more likely than others to say they would be interested in borrowing pre-loaded e-reading devices and take classes about how to use the devices and download books.

58% of Americans have a library card, and 69% say that their local library is important to them and their family.

Some 58% of those ages 16 and older have a library card, and 69% report that the library is important to them and their family. Women, whites, and parents of minor children are more likely to have library cards than other groups, and having a library card is also strongly correlated with educational attainment: 39% of those who have not completed high school have a library card, compared with 72% of those with at least a college degree. Those living in households making less than $30,000 per year, those living in rural areas, and adults ages 65 and older are less likely than other groups to have a library card.

At the same time, African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely than whites to say that the local library is important to them and their families. Overall, 38% of Americans ages 16 and older say that the public library is “very important,” and 31% say it is “somewhat important.” Some 17% say it is “not too important,” while 13% say it is “not important at all.” By comparison, some 48% of African-Americans say the library is very important to them, along with 43% of Hispanics, compared with 35% of whites.

When it comes to specific library services, African-Americans are more likely than whites 1) to use the local library to get access to historical documents or genealogical records; 2) to use the library to get access to databases such as legal or public records; and 3) to use the library to access or borrow newspapers or magazines or journals.

Library card holders are more than twice as likely to have bought their most recent book than to have borrowed it from a library. Many e-book borrowers purchase e-books, too.

In our December 2011 survey, 78% of those ages 16 and older said they had read a book in the past year. We asked those book readers about their borrowing and buying habits.

Among those who had read a book in the previous year, 48% say they had bought their most recent book; 24% borrowed it from a friend; 14% borrowed it from the library; and 13% got it another way. Among library card holders, a similar proportion (47%) say they had bought their most recent book, while 20% borrowed it from a friend, 20% borrowed it from the library, and 12% got it another way.

Among those who read e-books, 41% of those who borrow e-books from libraries purchased their most recent e-book.

We also asked book readers about their general preferences when it came to getting books. Fully 55% of the e-book readers who also had library cards said they preferred to buy their e-books and 36% said they preferred to borrow them from any source—friends or libraries. Some 46% of library card holders said they prefer to purchase print books they want to read and 45% said they preferred to borrow print books.

When it comes to e-book borrowers, 33% say they generally prefer to buy e-books and 57% say they generally prefer to borrow them.

The importance of buying books to e-book borrowers is also apparent when it comes to the places where they get book recommendations. Some 71% of e-book borrowers say they get book recommendations from online bookstores and websites; 39% say they get recommendations from the staff at bookstores they visit; and 42% say they get recommendations from librarians.

Asked where they look first when they are trying to find an e-book, 47% of those who borrow e-books from libraries say they first look at online bookstores and websites and 41% say they start at their public library.

Library card holders use more technology, and they report that they read more books.

Library card holders are more likely to own and use digital devices than those who don’t have cards. Card holders are more likely than others to be internet users (87% vs. 72%), more likely to own a cell phone (89% vs. 84%), and more likely to have a desktop or laptop computer (81% vs. 67%). And they are more likely than others to say they plan to purchase an e-reader or a tablet computer.

Library card holders also report they read more books than non-holders. In the 12 months before our December survey, library card holders report that they read an average (the mean number) of 20 books, compared with 13 books for non-card holders. The median (midpoint) figures for books reportedly read are 10 by library card holders and 5 by non-holders.

Leading-edge librarians and patrons say that the advent of e-books has produced a major transformation in book searching and borrowing at libraries.

In addition to conducting a representative phone survey, we also solicited thousands of comments online from library staff members and library patrons about their experiences in the relatively new world of e-books and e-book borrowing. Here are some of the main themes in their answers:

  • Book-borrowing habits are changing. Some of the most avid library users report they are going to library branches less and using the library website more for book and audio downloads. Additionally, patrons’ browsing is moving from in-library catalogs to online searches of library websites. As a result, “routine” traditional library interactions between patrons and librarians are receding in some places as interactions shift to online communications and downloads.
  • Library holdings are changing. A number of librarians report that some funds for purchasing printed books have been shifted to e-book purchases. Others’ libraries have cut back on other media purchases, such as CD audiobooks, to free up funds for purchases of e-books.
  • Librarians’ roles are changing. A majority of the librarians who responded to our query said they are excited about the role that e-books have played in their institutions and the way that e-books have added to patrons’ lives. At the same time, many report that much more of their time is devoted to providing “tech support” for patrons—both in their hardware needs and mastering software and the web—and away from traditional reference services. Librarians often are anxious about the new set of demands on them to learn about the operations of new gadgets, to master every new web application, and to de-bug every glitch on a digital device. A notable portion of librarians report they are self-taught techies. Staff training programs often help, but librarians report wide variance in the quality of some training efforts.

Imagining the future of libraries

Patrons and librarians were fairly uncertain about the exact way that libraries would function in the future. Overall, most librarians from our online panel thought that the evolution of e-book reading devices and digital content has been a good thing for libraries, and all but a few thought that the evolution of e-book reading devices and digital content has been a good thing for reading in general.

Still, there was a strong sense in answers from librarians and users that significant change was inevitable, even as readers’ romance with printed books persists. Some patrons talked about libraries with fewer printed books and more public meeting and learning spaces. Some librarians struggled to see past a murky transition. There was a combination of apprehension and excitement in their answers without a clear consensus about the structure and shape of the institution.

In brief: About this research

Quantitative data

All the statistics in this report, including all specific data about various groups, comes from a series of nationally-representative phone surveys of Americans. They were conducted in English and Spanish, by landline and cell phone. The main survey, of 2,986 Americans ages 16 and older, was conducted on November 16-December 21, 2011, and extensively focused on the new terrain of e-reading and people’s habits and preferences. This work was underwritten by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Several other nationally-representative phone surveys were conducted between January 5-8 and January 12-15, 2012 to see the extent to which adoption of e-book reading devices (both tablets and e-readers) might have grown during the holiday gift-giving season, and those growth figures are reported here. Finally, between January 20-Febuary 19, 2012, we re-asked the questions about the incidence of book reading in the previous 12 months in order to see if there had been changes because the number of device owners had risen so sharply. In general, however, all data cited in this report are from the November/December survey unless we specifically cite the subsequent surveys.

Qualitative material

The qualitative material in this report, including the extended quotes from individuals regarding e-books and library use, comes from two sets of online interviews that were conducted in May 2012. The first group of interviews was of library patrons who have borrowed an e-book from the library. Some 6,573 people answered at least some of the questions on the patron canvassing, and 4,396 completed the questionnaire. The second group of interviews was of librarians themselves. Some 2,256 library staff members answered at least some of the questions on the canvassing of librarians, and 1,180 completed the questionnaire.  Both sets of online interviews were opt-in canvassings meant to draw out comments from patrons and librarians, and they are not representative of the general population or even library users. As a result, no statistics or specific data points from either online questionnaire are cited in this report.

“Libraries Connect Communities: Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012,” the American Library Association and the Information Policy & Access Center (University of Maryland), June 19, 2012. http://www.ala.org/research/plftas/2011_2012

About Pew Internet

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project is an initiative of the Pew Research Center, a nonprofit “fact tank” that provides information on the issues, attitudes, and trends shaping America and the world. The Pew Internet Project explores the impact of the internet on children, families, communities, the work place, schools, health care and civic/political life.  The Project is nonpartisan and takes no position on policy issues. Support for the Project is provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts. More information is available at http://www.pewinternet.org.

First Edition Design eBook Publishing  First Edition Design Publishing, is the world’s largest eBook distributor. Ranked first in the industry, they convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The Company is a licensed and approved eBook Aggregator, Apple Developer and Microsoft Solution Provider.

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Microsoft Breaks Out New Surface Tablet #FED_ebooks #ereader #microsoft

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Microsoft aims to straddle two worlds with new Surface tablet

Several years behind its Silicon Valley rivals, Microsoft is betting it can play catch-up on tablets and smartphones by leveraging its dominance in the workplace and its success in the living room.

First Edition Design PublishingJust imagine Microsoft offering its Office software exclusively on the Surface while providing access to Xbox games and videos. It could be the right mix of professional and personal elements — a combination that Apple and Google haven’t been able to achieve fully. Then add the other online assets Microsoft has amassed over the years: the videoconferencing service Skype, the professional social network Yammer and the search engine Bing.

The potential is great, analysts say. That is, if the notoriously bureaucratic tech giant doesn’t end up repeating its past mistakes.

“Microsoft has had all the pieces for a consumer strategy for years, and they’ve totally and utterly failed time and time again,” said Michael Gartenberg, an analyst at Gartner research. Standout failures include Microsoft’s Zune music player and the Kin smartphone, which were panned by critics and fed the reputation of a company that was out of touch with consumers.

“The trick is if they can tie it all together into a compelling story and get consumers to buy into a whole ecosystem of devices and apps, which is what Apple has done so well and Google has done well, too,” Gartenberg said.

On Tuesday, Microsoft’s stock shot up by nearly 3 percent, though the shares are about half the value of their high reached in December 1999.

When it comes to tablets, Microsoft hopes office workers will want the Surface’s keyboard and stylus to produce Excel spreadsheets or PowerPoint presentations and then take the gadget home to watch movies. Microsoft on Wednesday is expected to roll out at least one new Windows 8 smartphone that will add to its mobile ecosystem.

Microsoft’s Office suite of apps has a stranglehold on businesses. It’s also gained a foothold in households with its Xbox Live, which has 40 million subscribers. The service charges customers a fee to play games online and watch streaming videos through their game console, which has sold 66 million units.

When it announced the Surface in Los Angeles on Monday night, chief executive Steve Ballmer said the device will straddle the tablet and PC worlds. The higher-end Surface will run the full version of Windows 8.

“No compromises,” Ballmer said. Microsoft didn’t announce a price or shipment date.

Apple, in contrast, appears to have drawn a brighter line between its tablet and Mac notebook, which for now run different operating systems, analysts said.

Microsoft’s move was prompted by the iPad’s runaway success. Tablet sales are expected to skyrocket 54 percent, to 107 million units this year, according to research firm IDC. In 2016, consumers will buy 221 million tablets, IDC said this week.

Tablets are stealing away laptops and computer owners and even beginning to win over some businesses. This year, PC sales are expected to rise just 5 percent, to 383 million units, compared with 10 percent growth the previous year.

Microsoft has struggled to keep an entrepreneurial edge given these sea changes in the computing world, experts say.

When Ballmer took over day-to-day operations from Bill Gates in 2000, he tried to thin out a bloated management structure. But engineers and marketing teams often worked in different buildings and traveled by shuttle bus across the vast Redmond, Wash., campus for meetings.

The move to develop its own hardware device also risks alienating key partners who have helped put the Windows software in the vast majority of households and businesses around the world.

“They have very little slack to make this new strategy relevant to everyone,” said Al Hilwa, an analyst at IDC. “Microsoft is trying to give you multiple access points to their ecosystem of content and apps, which is what Apple has done very well and Google is doing, too. It will be a race of giants.”

Source: http://www.washingtonpost.com  By Cecilia Kang, Published: June 19

First Edition Design Publishing

First Edition Design Publishing, is the world’s largest eBook distributor. Ranked first in the industry, they convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The Company is a licensed and approved eBook Aggregator, Apple Developer and Microsoft Solution Provider.

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Ebook Sales Surpass Hardcover for First Time in US #FED_ebooks #Author #Writer #ebooks

First Edition Design Publishing

Ebook Sales Surpass Hardcover for First Time in U.S.

American publishers are now bringing in more revenue from ebooks than hardcover books, according to a report published by the Association of American Publishers (AAP).

The figures, which were posted on GalleyCat on Friday, show that net sales revenue from ebooks exceeded that of hardcover books in the first quarter of the year: a first. The data was compiled from 1,189 publishers and did not include children’s books.

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

eBooks now outshine hardcover books.

Collectively, adult ebooks brought in $282.3 million in Q1. That’s an impressive 28.4% increase from the same period a year ago. Young adult and children’s ebooks performed even better, catapulting 233% to $64.3 million. Sales of adult hardcover books grew too, but more modestly, up 2.7% to $229.6 million in Q1 2012.

What’s driving the growth? The proliferation of ereading devices, from tablets and smartphones to dedicated ereaders, has a lot to do with it. Research published by Pew in April found a strong correlation between the spike in sales of ereading-capable devices and ebook adoption over the holidays.

Paperback sales continue to lead, bringing in $299.8 million in revenue in the first quarter of the year, but appear to be on the decline. (In fact, ebook sales surpassed paperback sales more than a year-and-a-half ago on Amazon.) Last year, net sales revenue for paperbacks amounted to $335 million.

Notably, downloadable audiobooks grew at an even greater rate than ebooks in that period, up 32.7% to $25 million in the first part of the year.First Edition Design eBook Publishing

SOURCE:  mashable.com – 18 June 2012

by Lauren Indvik

First Edition Design eBook and POD PublishingFirst Edition Design Publishing, is the world’s largest eBook distributor. Ranked first in the industry, they convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The Company is a licensed and approved eBook Aggregator, Apple Developer and Microsoft Solution Provider.

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Apple’s Antitrust Reply On eBooks: ‘We Benefited The Public’ #FED_ebooks #eBooks #Author #Writer

Apple’s Antitrust Reply On eBooks: ‘We Benefited The Public’

http://www.ibtimes.com Business & Books

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 6:42 AM EDT

By David Zielenziger

Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL), the world’s most valuable technology company, has acknowledged that its iPad made it a major force in ebooks but denied that it’s stifling competition in a formal reply to the Justice Department’s April antitrust lawsuit.

In a response to an antitrust complaint that was made by the U.S. Department of Justice in the U.S. District Court in New York on April 11, the Cupertino, Calif.-based company denied the charges and said the iPad had effectively broken an ebook monopoly held until 2010 by Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN), the No. 1 e-retailer.

“The Government sides with monopoly, rather than competition, in bringing this case,” Apple stated in its legal response, which was prepared by Daniel S. Floyd of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, Apple’s outside counsel.

Apple was sued along with five publishing giants for allegedly conspiring to fix the price of ebooks. The others were HarperCollins, a unit of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. (NYSE: NWS); Simon & Schuster, a unit of CBS Corp. (NYSE: CBS); Penguin Group, a unit of Pearson PLC (NYSE: PSO); Hachette, an imprint of France’s Lagardere (EPA: MMB); and Macmillan, a unit of Germany’s private Holtzbrinck.

All of the defendants have settled except for Apple, Macmillan and Penguin.

Since the lawsuit, Apple shares have shed nearly 9 percent of their value. They closed Tuesday at $572.27, up $9.98. Shares of Seattle-based Amazon have declined 1 percent. They closed Tuesday at $214.75, up $1.86.

Nevertheless, Apple’s brief sheds light on some of the process behind its entry into ebooks. Among them:

The iPad wasn’t intended as an eBook reader. “Apple did not believe it was necessary to sell eBooks for the iPad to be successful,” the brief reads. “But [it] concluded that if a viable iBookstore model could be created, it would consider offering eBooks.”

Apple always wanted a 30 percent commission. Rather than use Amazon’s one-price model, Apple always wanted to collect a 30 percent cut from every publisher, a so-called “agency commission.” The reason is that sales through the AppStore, which has sold more than 25 billion items, are based on the same model.

Steve Jobs was involved in setting up the eBookstore. Apple CEO Steve Jobs was aware of internal efforts to create the iBookstore as shown in emails to retail Executive VP Eddy Cue a year before the iPad came out. But Cue handled the details and first contacted the publishers as late as December 2009.

Jobs, though, personally contacted one senior executive of a publisher “to discuss whether or not the publisher would sign up.” Identities were not disclosed. Jobs died Oct. 5, 2011.

Some publishers were upset at Amazon.com. That’s a reason why they talked to Apple about an alternative platform to the Seattle e-retailer because some believed Amazon was selling books below cost.

Apple didn’t require them to “contractually adhere to a $9.99 price ceiling regardless of competitive or market conditions,” the brief states.

Apple wanted all publishers for the iBookstore. While many of the terms were the same, there was no forced agreement for any of them to commit to Apple. The proposals, though, “were similar” but not intended to fix prices.

Apple’s entry into the book market is protected by the First Amendment. A common claim in publishing, Apple said that it is free to engage in book publishing as part of its constitutional rights.

Next up: Apple and its co-defendants will likely ask the court to dismiss the case. Barring that, it’s likely the company and its co-defendants will engage in some last-minute bargaining before a trial begins in New York. With cash and investments exceeding $110 billion, Apple could go to trial and pay lawyers forever. Or it could sign some sort of consent decree that would subject it to some kind of judicial or Justice Department scrutiny.

Other technology giants, including International Business Machines Corp. (NYSE: IBM) and Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) are very familiar with that path. Apple will have to write its own book — or ebook — in this case.

First Edition Design PublishingFirst Edition Design Publishing, based in Sarasota, Florida, USA leads the industry in eBook distribution.They convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The Company is a licensed Apple Developer and a Microsoft Solution Provider.

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How to: Give #eBooks As Gifts #FED_ebooks #Author #Writer #Indieauthor

How to: Give eBooks As Gifts
Source: cnet.com

Click To View Video

First Edition Design PublishingFirst Edition Design Publishingbased in Sarasota, Florida, USA leads the industry in eBook distribution. They convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. The Company is a licensed Apple Developer and a Microsoft Solution Provider.

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College Students Prefer eTextbooks Survey Shows #FED_ebooks #ebooks #Author #Writer #Indieauthor

First Edition Design Publishing

College Students Boost Digital Adoption, According to CourseSmart Survey

  • Research shows that majority of students are more likely to bring a laptop than a print textbook to class with 53% of device owners reading eTextbooks frequently —
Press Release: CourseSmart

SAN MATEO, Calif., May 23, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — CourseSmart®, a provider of eTextbooks and digital course materials, today announced the results of a survey revealing college students’ growing reliance on technology. The survey of more than 500 currently enrolled college students found that nearly all college students  (98%) who own a device have used it for school and a majority of these students (53%) read eTextbooks frequently. Further, 90% of college students say they save time studying with technology — including mobile devices, digital textbooks, eReaders and tablets.

Fielded by Wakefield Research, an independent research consultancy, the survey revealed that technology has become a significant part of students’ everyday lives with the average using three devices daily. A majority (67%) can’t go more than one hour without using some sort of digital technology, with 40% not lasting more than 10 minutes.

“The survey underscores the undeniable influence technology has on today’s college experience. As technology continues to evolve and digital devices become integral to the evolution of higher education, it’s encouraging to see the positive impact on learning outcomes as students utilize advanced devices and digital course materials to streamline and improve their learning environment,” said Sean Devine, CEO of CourseSmart.

The Digital Backpack

First Edition Design PublishingOnce the backpack staple, print textbooks are losing their reputation of being indispensable. Only 5% of students say textbooks are the most important item in their bag and a majority of students say they are more likely to bring a laptop (51%) than a print textbook (39%) to class. Digital devices also allow for on-the-go reference to information with 79% of college students reporting they have done a quick search on a mobile device or tablet to verify something right before a test or a quiz.

According to the survey, technology is also streamlining students’ studies. The study found that 68% of college students who save time using technology report saving two hours or more each day and nearly one in six students (14%) saving five hours or more. Further, nearly 3 in 5 students (58%) report that they frequently are unable to complete required reading in time for class and of those, a majority (51%) said they would be more likely to do so if they had digital textbooks that could be accessed on a mobile device, eReader, laptop or tablet.

Online Learning Gains Momentum

Online courses are gaining popularity with 58% of students reporting they have taken an online course, motivated primarily by being able to take the class on their own time (63%), not having to physically be in a class (48%) and being able to learn at their own pace (47%). Even traditional brick and mortar classes, though, are incorporating online elements, creating increasingly hybrid experiences. Nearly all (96%) college students have had online components to a course: a majority of students (79%) have submitted assignments or papers online and 71% have taken online tests and quizzes.

Rise of Social

According to the survey, communication between faculty and students is becoming more social with nearly one in five (18%) students having received materials from their professor via Facebook. Professors are also relying more on technology for delivering class announcements and assignments: 84% of students have had professors post a class syllabus online and 78% of students have received class news and updates from their professors via campus systems, such as learning management systems or student portals.

“As we look forward, we will continue to see technology incorporated into even the most traditional of college experiences and classes. Within this new digital learning environment, students will have access to their entire higher education network, including social, grades, quizzes, textbooks and other course materials, in the palm of their hands,” added Devine.

Methodological Notes

The CourseSmart Survey was conducted by Wakefield Research (www.wakefieldresearch.com) among 500 Americans currently enrolled in college, ages 18-23, between Monday, April 30th, 2012 and Tuesday, May 8th, 2012, using an email invitation and an online survey. Quotas were set to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the total U.S. population between the ages of 18 and 23.

First Edition Design Publishing

First Edition Design Publishing, based in Sarasota, Florida, USA leads the industry in eBook distribution. They convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network.

First Edition Design eBook Publishing

What Speed Do You Read? Take This Test! #FED_ebooks #Writer #Author #ebooks

Source: Fox News – Kansas City, MO

KANSAS CITY, MO. — Think you’re a fast reader? Want to put your reading skills to the test? Well, now, thanks to Staples.com, you can.

But first, declare yourself!

Are you a “skimmer” or a reader? The idea is that you can be a really fast “skimmer” but if you don’t remember what First Edition Design Publishingyou’ve read — were you really reading?

In today’s Internet age people tend to skim paragraphs looking for key words. Doing so bumps up your reading rate to about 700 words per minute — but you also lower your comprehension rate. Still, if you’re looking for key words for pinpointed information, this style of reading can be beneficial.

On average, adults read about 300 words per minute. According to Staples, the speed reading record is 4,700 words a minute.

If you think you can beat that and want to put your reading skills to the test, Staples has created just the thing for you. Staples’ timed test allows you to compare your reading skills to the national average. But don’t skim because you’ll also be tested on your comprehension via three quiz questions.

Ready? Set, go!

ereader test

Source: Staples eReader Department

First Edition Design PublishingFirst Edition Design Publishing, based in Sarasota, Florida, USA leads the industry in eBook distribution.They convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network.

First Edition Design Publishing

Shift from print books to #ebooks #Author #Writer #FED_ebooks

 E-book Nation

First Edition Design Publishing

First Edition Design Publishing

 First Edition Design Publishing http:www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com, based in Sarasota, Florida, USA leads the industry in eBook distribution. They convert, format and submit eBooks to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, BooksOnBoard, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, scores of additional on-line retailers and libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company also has a POD (Print On Demand) division, which creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network.