Tag Archives: kids

8 Great Writing Tips for Kids

I’m 33 now (which feels very old!) but I’ve loved writing since I was a kid myself. The very first story I remember writing was about a mouse, when I was five or six. I spent a lot of time writing stories throughout my childhood, and I had a go at my first novel when I was thirteen.

Writing has always been one of my favourite things to do … and for the last ten years, it’s been what I’ve done for a living.

When I was at school, a lot of the writing I did was as part of my school work. At school, your teachers are probably keen for you to know lots of things about writing – like where to put commas, and what nouns and verbs are, and so on.

There are lots of great tips out there about how to get things like that right, and I’ll link to some of those for you in this post. I wanted to focus on some tips, though, about enjoying writing and having fun with it … and about becoming a better writer overall (not just a better speller)!

Here are my best tips on how to keep growing and improving as a writer, however young you are:

#1: Have a go at some writing exercises – you can find lots of these online, or you could have a go at them in workbooks or school books. Lots of adults find writing exercises helpful, too, so that they can get better at writing. You can find some great ones to try here.

#2: Read a lot. Almost every writer I know is also a keen reader. Try to read a wide range of different things – like classic story books as well as modern ones, non-fiction (factual) books, magazine or newspaper articles, and so on. You’ll come across lots of different ways to write, and you might learn some new words.

#3: Keep a little book of new words you learn. Don’t be embarrassed if you don’t understand a word the first time you read it. Sometimes you can guess from the rest of the sentence what it means, but if not, you can just look it up in a dictionary. You might want to ask an adult how to say the new word, too – you could write down how it sounds. For instance, “matron” is pronounced “may-tron” (with a long “a” sound) not “mah-tron” (with a short “a” sound), which is how I thought it was said when I first read it in an Enid Blyton story.

#4: Try writing stories for children younger than you, or stories that involve children younger than you. This is a great thing to do when you’re still quite young yourself, because you can remember what it’s like to be six or seven. (Adult writers find it hard to remember, and often they create young children characters who are too babyish for their age.) If you have a little brother or sister, or a younger cousin, you could read your stories out to them.

#5: Remember that even adults don’t get things right first time. Sometimes I get a spelling wrong, or I write a sentence that’s confusing for my reader. And I’m a professional writer! It’s fine to make mistakes, so don’t worry about getting everything perfect in your first draft. Just make sure you leave a bit of time to go back and edit afterwards (just like adult writers do) so that you can fix any mistakes.

#6: Have a go at different types of writing. When I was young, I like to make pretend magazines or newspapers. That’s something that children have enjoyed doing for a very long time – in one of my favourite classic children’s books, The Story of the Treasure Seekers by E. Nesbit, the children in the story make their own newspaper filled with things they’ve written. Maybe you could have a go at making a newspaper to share with your family and friends – or maybe you’d like to write poetry or a play script, or something else entirely.

#7: Keep a journal about your day to day life. There are lots of ways to do this – you could write a sentence or two each day, for instance, or you could write a longer piece once a week. You could write about what you’re learning at school, who your friends are, the games you’ve been playing … even what you had for lunch! Details that might seem boring now could be really interesting when you read your journal when you’re 20 or 30 or even 80!

#8: Ask for help if you get stuck. If there’s something you don’t understand in what you’re reading, or if you can’t work out if something you’ve written is quite right, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Most adults will be very glad to give you a hand. You could try a teacher, or a librarian (either at your school library or your local library). If you get to meet any adult writers, perhaps through school or at an event, think up some good questions for them too!

I hope you have lots of fun with your writing. It can feel like there’s a lot to get right, but (outside of school time) the most important thing is that you enjoy writing. I hope the ideas above help you to get even more out of writing. If you’ve got any tips of your own, why not share them with us in the comments?

By Ali Hale

Source: dailywritingtips.com

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Halloween Apps and eBooks for Kids #FED_ebooks #free #apps #Halloween #ebook

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Apps and eBooks to Get Your Kids in the Halloween Spirit

 

The App Store is booming with fun and creative apps, ideal for keeping your kids entertained for hours. With Halloween just a few weeks away, here are a few apps for you to load on your smartphone to get your family in the Halloween spirit!

 

Scrap It: Halloween HD – FREEEbook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market

Scrap It: Halloween HD is a free app, allowing you to upload photos and create a Halloween-themed e-scrapbook. You can pick through hundreds of photo effects and choose from stickers, text fonts and a variety of themed background images. Once you’re finished, you can preview your scrapbook as an image slideshow, or even upload it online to share with friends and family.

 Halloween Card Creator – FREE

Halloween Card Creator allows you to create fun and spooky Halloween cards to share with your friends and family. Cards are easily customizable with fun graphics and background, and you can publish the final product online. For $0.99, you can upgrade the free version to include more clip art options.

 Scary Sounds – FREE

Scary Sounds, a free app, lets you create your own haunted house of horror! You can choose from a sound bank of scary sounds, or even create a combination of sounds to loop. Sounds include growling, laugh, howl, screech, wicked witch laugh and wolves howling. Attach your smartphone to a speaker and create a spooky ambiance for your next Halloween party.

 Carve a Pumpkin from Parents Magazine – FREE

Carve a Pumpkin allows your kids who want to try out carving a pumpkin before attempting the real thing. Your kids are able to pick from a library of crazy eye, nose and mouth shapes, or you can carve your own jack-o-lantern. It’s fun, interactive, and easy to use. Once your kid has finished, they can add their own message and share their creation online.

 Great Halloween Recipes – $0.99

Great Halloween Recipes allows party hosts to discover new and tasty recipes to help you make the most of the Halloween theme. You can find many interesting treat ideas including appetizers, main entrees, mocktails and dessert ideas.

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market Great Halloween iBooks:

Franklin’s Halloween – iBookstore ($5.99)  Franklin and his friends are excited about the upcoming Halloween costume party. With tricks and treats and a flying ghost, Franklin and his friends enjoy a night of mystery fun.

The Little Engine That Could Throw a Halloween Jamboree! – iBookstore ($0.99)  The Little Engine That Could celebrates Halloween by throwing a jamboree full of fun games and contests.

Disney Princess: Sweet and Spooky Halloween – iBookstore ($3.99)  It’s Halloween and the Disney Princesses are celebrating this sweet and spooky season. Cinderella carves pumpkins, Ariel dresses up in costume and Belle explores the creepy corners of the Beast’s castle.

Count Dagmar – iBookstore ($6.99)  Help Count Dagmar, a vegetarian vampire, get ready for his party. Count fuzzy bats, silly monsters and friendly ghosts in this delightfully wacky and sweet interactive book.

Five Little Pumpkins – iBookstore ($5.99)  Light up pumpkins, watch ghosts fly and discover hidden animations on every page. Toddlers enjoy the rhythmic story and vibrant illustrations.

Source: Huffingtonpost.com By: Winston Sih  

 

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Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) book distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts and formats manuscripts for every type of platform (e-reader). They submit Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and over 100,000 additional on-line locations including retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company’s POD division creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. First Edition Design Publishing is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.

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