Monthly Archives: October 2012

Stephen King’s Advice #FED_ebooks #author #writer #indieauthor #teacher

Stephen King offers insight on what it takes to be an author.

 

About First Edition Design Publishing:

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) book distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts and formats manuscripts for every type of platform (e-reader). They submit Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and over 100,000 additional on-line locations including retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company’s POD division creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. First Edition Design Publishing is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

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Best eReader Apps for #Apple #iPad #ebooks #FED_ebooks #author

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Best e-Reader Apps for the iPad

 

The iPad is a multifaceted device, but one of the primary functions is ebook reading. Apple has devoted significant resources to ensure ebook reading on the iPad is a pleasant affair. Presented below are a few apps that vie for consumer attention rated for ease of use, depth of content, and overall experience.

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market

iBooks:

iBooks is Apple’s very own ebook reading application and it has quickly risen to the top, on account of the stupendous success the iPad has achieved. This is hardly surprising, considering the app is best integrated for the iPad, which means there is no requirement of any external software to read books. Also, with the iBook Store just a tap or two away, you will never find yourself lacking a good e-book to read.

However, it has also been the subject of some harsh criticism with experts often accusing Apple of having put a heavy emphasis on the looks and feel of the app at the cost of functionality and usability. So while the app looks great and page turns almost look like a real book, users have often complained about the inability to maximize the ebook experience to make the most of available screen space and so on. The inability to remove pagination graphics is another irritant. The iBooks search is another feature that needs to be worked on. Searching by keyword is still not an option and until that happens, searching by title is the only options for users. Categories are too general, which means searching by categories is a headache.

That said, there are several pluses with the iBook application, which can be used to read ePub and PDF files. Books can be obtained not only from the Apple iStore, but also from Project Guntenberg or any of the user’s own ePub or PDF files. Readability is excellent, which is enhanced further with the Retina Display in the new iPad 3. There are no distracting ads or other such things, which is another big plus. Users also have the option to pen down notes for specific passages for research and later reference.

Bluefire Reader:

The Bluefire Reader is one of the best independent ebook reading apps for the iPad, with its biggest selling point being that it uses the Adobe Digital Editions DRM platform. What this means is that the Bluefire app can be used to read DRM-protected PDF and ePub ebooks that you might have purchased from independent ebook retailers. This also makes the app perfect for reading ebooks borrowed from public libraries. With this app, the user won’t be tied down to a particular ecosystem.

The Bluefire Reader also offers the usual customization options such as font sizes, line spacing, color schemes, and so on.

Amazon Kindle:

Amazon is the pioneer in this field and started this entire trend in the first place. However, with the demographic change that the entire ebook segment has gone through, Amazon has found itself to be in direct competition with Apple. So the best thing Amazon can do is develop a Kindle app for iOS, which will allow iPad users to browse over 1,000,000 ebooks that Amazon hosts.

The app works great and reading a book on it is a pleasant experience. However, there is no way to buy books from within the app. Instead, users will have to buy from Amazon via the Safari browser. Also, as is usually the case, the app is heavily dependent on the Amazon ebook store, but that shouldn’t be a problem for those who have already invested substantially in the Amazon ecosystem.

Barnes & Noble Nook:

The B&N Nook ebook app follows the same principle as the Amazon app, allowing non-Nook users to source their books from the huge B&N store that comprises of more than two million ebooks. What makes the Nook app all the better is that it offers more customization options than other paid content readers. These include different font sizes, font types, colors schemes, or margins. This app is great for providing the best reading experience based on personal preferences. These are in addition to the usual reader app preferences such as notes, highlights, bookmarks, searching within the book, sync last page read, dictionary look-up, and such.

Kobo:

Kobo is the third of the big trio (Amazon and B&N being the other two) that offers an opening to the vast Kobo ebook store via its Kobo app on the iPad. Also, just like the Kindle or Nook apps, the Kobo app is tied to the Kobo ebook store and won’t respond to any other ebooks downloaded from any other source. Kobo also provides the standard amount of customization options that all reader supply.

Google Books:

Google Books is the newest addition to the reader apps available for the iPad and comprises of no less than 3 million ebooks. Apart from providing for a nice reading experience, the Google Book app boasts of some unique qualities, such as VoiceOver support or offline reading. Another interesting feature with Google Books is that many of the volumes from the Google bookstore are actually scanned copies of the actual literature, which means users will get to see the original form of the literature, including the typesetting and illustrations wherever present. On the flip side, users may not get to see the book in its entirety as a page may be shown to be warped depending on how the pages were treated on the scanning device. However, for the more important titles, Google also offers the regular ebook mode that will offer them in proper ebook format. Readers will just have to select ‘Flowing Text’ to enable viewing in ebook format.

Another nice aspect of the Google Book app is the night reading mode, which presents the text in inverted white letters against a black background. The seven different typefaces along with a wide variety of text sizes further enhances the night mode reading experience.

What makes the Google Book app different from the others is its heavy dependence on cloud connectivity. What this means is that none of the free scanned ebooks will be downloaded onto the iPad. Instead, they will be loaded into cloud storage directly from the internet and as a result is very network intensive. This won’t be an ideal situation in those areas that suffer from network issues.

Stanza:

Stanza is another popular ebook reading app that is not tied to any particular store. Interestingly, Amazon is the current owner of it, but has kept the store independent. What adds to the app’s appeal is that it is compliant with a range of ebook formats, including Mobipocket, PalmDoc (DOC), Microsoft LIT, HTML, PDF, Microsoft Word, and Rich Text Format (RTF).

Stanza is also tied to a range of booksellers such as Feedbooks, Random House, Harlequin, Project Gutenberg, Munseys, BookGlutton, Mutopia, and PanMacmillan, from which users can source their ebook requirements. The app also boasts of solid functionality as well as an excellent search utility.

Source: www.goodereader.com  By: Sovan Mandal

About First Edition Design Publishing:

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) book distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts and formats manuscripts for every type of platform (e-reader). They submit Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and over 100,000 additional on-line locations including retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company’s POD division creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. First Edition Design Publishing is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

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Are eBooks Safe From Pirates? #FED_ebooks #ebook #author #indieauthor

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How Safe are eBooks From Illegal Copying?

 

Publishing has enjoyed a far smoother journey into the electronic age than the music business. But that doesn’t mean it can be complacent about piracy.

While the collapse of early file-sharing site Napster did not kill music piracy, it nonetheless highlighted battle lines between legitimate and bogus music resources on the web – developments that are now proving relevant to online book publishing too.

June marked a full decade since Napster filed for bankruptcy, weakened by multiple copyright lawsuits from record labels and their artists. Two months on from that anniversary, the UK branch of online retailer Amazon announced that its sales of Kindle ebooks had finally outstripped those of their print ancestors: 114 digital publications selling for every 100 physical ones. In between those two milestones occurred an incident that neatly linked them together…

Confess – or be shamed

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book marketIt concerned the July release of fantasy author Terry Goodkind’s novel, The First Confessor – a long-awaited prequel to his bestselling Sword of Truth series. Aiming to test his audience’s uptake of electronic reading devices, Goodkind published the tome as an ebook exclusive, with just 300 special limited edition print copies available to diehard collectors. Sales of the ebook soared instantly. But Goodkind was enraged when he became aware of pirate copies that emerged within days of the official publication. For the author, this was particularly galling, as he had prepared the ebook for release himself – unaided by his regular publisher Tor.

His wrath inflamed, Goodkind took to his Facebook page to name and shame one of the pirates – one Josh Press. In a posting that included Press’s photograph, Goodkind accused him of having ‘no respect for a hard-working author’ and asked him: ‘Can’t [you] be bothered to read and consider our note on piracy in the front of the book?’ In a subsequent posting, Goodkind explained that he’d wanted to expose ‘someone that claimed to be a fan, a reader of books, had accessibility to the books, had every incentive to purchase and support them, but instead chose … to disregard the work, [and] the values within it’.

Which begs the question: is illegal ebook copying becoming as big a threat to intellectual property (IP) as music piracy?

Wild West gadgets

Publishers and authors have every reason to be wary of ebook piracy, with its grave implications for revenue – and the IP system that is meant to protect them.

Impacts of the practice are felt across IP categories: as well as duplicating the copyrighted content of its source text, a pirated ebook is infringing upon the trademarks of the author and publisher. And as US legislators propose Acts that could enable IP enforcers to seize domains suspected of hosting pirated content, the message to web managers is that stringent housekeeping of their sites would be welcomed sooner rather than later.

But there are differing views on how seriously ebook piracy should be taken. In a June article for the Wall Street Journal, Listen.com founder Rob Reid pointed out that the circumstances in which ebook piracy has emerged are subtly different to those that drove the early years of music-file sharing. For a start, he argued, the popularity of ebook technology – led by Amazon’s patented Kindle device – has grown in tandem with the spread of legitimate content, narrowing the scope of pirates’ operations.

That is in stark contrast to early file sharing, which was driven by the first wave of MP3 devices such as the Rio, released in 1998. Beating Apple’s first iPod model to the market by three years, the Rio operated in a Wild West climate where online music was the preserve of file sharers and had yet to be reined in by legitimate, label-endorsed services such as iTunes or Spotify. Taking advantage of such a lax environment, file sharers ripped and distributed as many tracks as their devices could accommodate, and the record labels quickly began to haemorrhage content – and profits.

DRM: shield or obstacle?

Working through their trade body, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), US-based labels initiated court action against Rio manufacturer Diamond Multimedia to block sales of the player in the year of its release. In the case, the RIAA thought it held an ace in the form of the 1992 Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA): legislation designed to allay label fears over the spread of digital audio tape (DAT) machines, which could make sound reproductions identical in quality to studio recordings.

The RIAA argued that, under the Act, the Rio should include an early form of digital rights management (DRM) technology called the serial copy management system (SCMS) – software that would prevent consumers from using the Rio to duplicate tracks. It also stressed that Diamond should pay royalties on the song files held by its players. However, in the first stage of the case at the Central District of California and its subsequent Federal replay on the Ninth Circuit, the RIAA was defeated: judges ruled that the Rio fell outside the scope of the Act.

It was inevitable that a DRM debate would emerge in connection with ebooks, and that has been the case this year. In April, Goodkind’s regular publisher Tor announced plans to drop DRM from its entire electronic catalogue, following consumers’ complaints that the software prevented them from reading their ebooks on multiple devices (eg, iPads and other, non-Kindle readers). So, in that case, technological factors urged a content provider to move away from the record-label position of the late 1990’s. But other publishers, including Hachette – which considers DRM a valuable resource – are concerned that abandoning it would harm authors’ rights and royalties.

Another organization that is taking a keen interest in the protection of ebooks is the UK Publishers Association (PA). Despite Reid’s downplaying of ebook piracy in the Wall Street Journal, the PA revealed earlier this year that, in the course of 2011, it issued 115,000 cease-and-desist orders to websites offering pirated titles – an increase of 130% on the previous year. The group takes the problem very seriously, and provides authors and publishers with anti-piracy advice on its website.

In a recent interview with PC Pro, PA chief executive Richard Mollet backed DRM, but argued that authors and publishers required more comprehensive assistance. ‘You need more than just technical measures to prevent infringement,’ he said. ‘You also need strong legal services so people don’t infringe in the first place.’

One author who has remained resolutely unruffled by ebook piracy is Paolo Coelho, the man behind mega-selling, spiritual-quest novel The Alchemist. In February, he called upon internet copycats to ‘pirate everything I’ve ever written’, because he was convinced it would stimulate real sales. Perhaps his remark conveyed some of the originality that has made him a successful writer. But, equally so, perhaps his sentiment is far too Zen for an industry under threat.

Source: http://www.cpaglobal.com By: Matt Packer

Do you fear eBook pirates?

About First Edition Design Publishing:

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market First Edition Design Publishing is the world’s largest eBook and POD (Print On Demand) book distributor. Ranked first in the industry, First Edition Design Publishing converts and formats manuscripts for every type of platform (e-reader). They submit Fiction, Non-Fiction, Academic and Children’s Books to Amazon, Apple, Barnes and Noble, Sony, Google, Kobo, Diesel, 3M, Ingram, Baker and Taylor, Nielsen, EBSCO, and over 100,000 additional on-line locations including retailers, libraries, schools, colleges and universities. The company’s POD division creates printed books and makes them available worldwide through their distribution network. First Edition Design Publishing is a licensed and approved Aggregator and holds licenses with Apple and Microsoft.

Visit: www.firsteditiondesignpublishing.com

Ebook Publishing Design Edition First Graphic Aggregators Ebooks Publishers Distribution POD Designing Approved Aggregator How Services Academic Distributor Chapter Submission Professional Firsteditiondesignpublishing.com published book market

First Edition Design eBook Publisher Aggregator Master Distrbutor